Black Matter

This video shows a kinetic piece that uses magnetism to highlight patterns in nature and the tension between order and chaos.

As well as supporting studies you can also see a video 'sketch' of the sculpture ahead of its completion. Video 'sketch' Sound by Laura Tack


Certain thinkers say that soul is intermingled in the whole universe.’ - Aristotle

A visceral awareness of invisible, powerful forces provoking an inexplicable yearning for a comprehension of the abstract, lies at the centre of Black Matter.

Through Black Matter and the force of magnetism, parallels are drawn between the macrocosm and microcosm.

Within a magnetic object all electrons are spinning in the same direction. As they become aligned their electromagnetic force is magnified until it is large enough to be felt at a distance.  This force of magnetism is experienced as a physical repulsion and attraction. The kinetic works of Black Matter reflect the atomic structure of magnets and how this, in turn, generates the phenomenon we experience as magnetism.

This perceived unending movement of a magnetic field reinforces the continuous closed loops and cyclic systems throughout nature.  The relentless flow of attraction and repulsion of a magnetic field is incessant but possesses a sense of change; it always has a beginning and an end but there is a point at which one becomes another. This constant flow and sense of momentum is seen in the orbits of planets; a repetition of movement, alignment and a notion of a symbiotic system in equilibrium while retaining a sense of flux with all its exquisite complexities and synchronicity.

The to and fro from order to disorder is explored with particular importance put on the boundary between these two states where phase locking comes into play. There is a point at which patterns become indiscernible and a point at which forms can be observed in chaos. A pendulum is seen as a symbol of reliable, rhythmic order but its swing can represent and embody both an ordered and chaotic system, a compelling duality.

Magnetism is a force experienced, observed and quantified in the modern age yet still retains an aura of the imaginary. A phenomenon felt that keeps its mechanism from view drives us to ask questions; it appears to us to be borne of magic, captivating the part of our being where childlike awe resides.

Taking a cue from Thales ‘“All things are full of Gods’, it is appropriate to bring these micro and macro realms to reconcile under the umbrella of magnetism; the powers of attraction and repulsion are a fitting metaphor for our compulsion to seek out the divine and our inability to embody it, catapulting us back into incomprehension.